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F Blues

F Blues is one of the most common keys for the blues.  Now’s The Time, Bag’s Groove, Billie’s Bounce, and Blues for Alice(Bebop blues changes) are all examples of an F blues. This is one you should know inside and out. Chord charts include bebop blues changes, aka “Bird blues”.

Practice the blues in another key: Blues in All 12 Keys

Corcovado

Corcovado is a wonderful bossa nova tune by Antonio Carlos Jobim. It’s also known as “Quiet Nights and Quiet Stars,” which is the first lyric of the tune when sung in English. It was originally written in Portuguese.

 

It is important to know that this tune can be a 34-bar or 36-bar song form.  When it is done as a 36-bar song form, each chorus resolves at the end to C major.  However, it is very common for the tune to be played with 34 bars, leaving off the last couple of bars until the last head.  When the tune is played with 34 bars, the tune doesn’t resolve to C until the very end.  The play along and the chord charts show use the unresolving 34-bar song form.
Corcovado Mountain overlooks Rio de Janeiro.  Corcovado means “hunchback” in Portuguese.  Look at the first image, and you will know how Corcovado Mountain got its name!

The world famous “Christ the Redeemer” statue is at the top of the mountain named “Corcovado” overlooking Rio de Janeiro.

“CHRIST THE REDEEMER” STATUE ON CORCOVADO MOUNTAIN OVERLOOKING RIO DE JANEIRO

 

E Blues

While E blues is a common key for styles such as rock, it is rarely used in jazz. However practicing in this key will really help develop your ear for this music. Chord charts include bebop blues changes, aka “Bird blues”.

Practice the blues in another key: Blues in All 12 Keys

Eb Blues

Eb is a common key for the blues.  Sandu is a classic example of a blues in this key. Chord charts include bebop blues changes, aka “Bird blues”.

Practice the blues in another key: Blues in All 12 Keys

D Blues

The D blues is less common than other keys like Bb, Eb, F, and C, but it’s still important to know. Studying the Blues in D can also help when tackling tunes in D minor, which are far more common.
Chord charts include bebop blues changes, aka “Bird blues”.

Practice the blues in another key: Blues in All 12 Keys

Db Blues

The Db Blues is not a common key for the blues.  However, there are blues tunes in this key.  Things Ain’t What They Used to Be is an example of a Db Blues. Chord charts include bebop blues changes, aka “Bird blues”.

Practice the blues in another key: Blues in All 12 Keys

C Blues

C Blues is a common blues key in jazz music. It is an especially popular key for Charlie Parker’s bebop heads on the common blues form such as Cheryl and Relaxin’ At Camarillo. Chord charts also include changes for bebop blues, aka “Bird Blues”.

Practice the blues in another key: Blues in All 12 Keys

B Blues

B Blues is not a common blues in jazz. Since it is only a half step away from Bb, which is a common blues, it can be a more challenging one to navigate. Therefore this is a great one to practice. Chord charts include bebop blues changes, aka “Bird blues”.

Practice the blues in another key: Blues in All 12 Keys

Bb Blues

The Bb blues is a common blues in jazz music. Examples include Tenor Madness or Monk’s Blues At 5 Spot. This one is certainly one to be strong at, so practice up! Chord charts include the bebop blues changes, aka “Bird Blues” changes.

Practice the blues in another key: Blues in All 12 Keys

Use of Melodic Minor scale in Stella by Starlight

When you play over a minor ii-V chord progression, such as the first two chords of Stella by Starlight (which you expect to resolve to the minor i, D-, but it goes to a ii-V in Bb instead) one fun sound to play around with is the melodic minor scale.

Over the ii-7b5, use a melodic minor scale a minor third up from the root.

E-7b5=G melodic minor (GABbCDEF#G, a G major scale with a minor third basically).

Over the V7 chord, use a melodic minor scale a half-step up from the root.

A7#5=Bb melodic minor (BbCDbEbFGABb. In non theoretical terms a Bb major scale with a b3)

Enjoy the example! It uses an F mixolydian scale over the  ii-V at the end, or a F mixolydian bebop scale because it has a chromatic passing tone.